Notes from Jeff York

Small business marketing thoughts from a marketing small business owner

Posts Tagged ‘company

It’s a solution, not my solution

with 2 comments

scarybox1I was once attached to a company that actively sought out to put themselves into the following trap:

Generate a suite of business solutions that we can hang our hat on. These solutions will serve the majority of businesses regardless of their market position and valuation. By generating a suite of “off the shelf” solutions, the company will save on resources that otherwise would have to go to generating unique solutions for every new client. Furthermore, once our sales team learns the suite, they can speak very passionately and effectively about it to prospects.

That company is no longer in business. This practice was a major contributor to their demise.

Quick, name two companies that operate exactly the same. Name two companies for which an off-the-shelf solution (software, operational, marketing, or otherwise) could quickly be immediately integrated and effective. You can’t because there is none.

Every business faces different challeneges dependent on a host of variables from their marketspace to their corporate values. Two different companies that make identical widgets do so in different ways.

I recently was connected to an organization which created boilerplate new business pitches. The budget that followed the boilerplate was, of course, customized to reflect the client and project, but the majority of the paperwork was submitted untouched. If you try to play this game, you put your chances of winning the business in peril. Your proposal comes off being to generic and ends up being as ineffective as a generic cover letter.

It takes work to get work. Anything worth having is worth working for. By taking the extra time to generate proposals and solutions for each individual situation shows that you are earnest when you say “I want to work with you. I want to do work for you.”

Written by Jeff York

October 16, 2009 at 2:27 pm

Buy this now!

leave a comment »

circuit_city_logoAs any of my past teachers will tell you, when I get bored, I get into trouble. In order to keep out of trouble and to keep my mind sharp, there have been times in the past when in addition to my career, I take a part time job in an area completely different from what I do full time. In the past, I have served as a paid tax preparer, deli worker, photomat technician, I’m still licensed by the state to sell life insurance, and I am now coming to the end of my time as a sales associate at the soon to be defunct electronic retailer, Circuit City.

From my relatively brief time at Circuit City (started Oct and my last day will be in Feb), I have an excellent vantage point from which to see some of the failings of that company. First, a little background.

The store that I as employed at was not a traditional Circuit City. Instead, it was modeled as an “Experience Store” type offering. By that, it differed from the other Circuit City stores in the following ways:

– We had a greeter at the front door. At WalMart, this person’s role is to make someone feel welcome when walking into the store. At The City, the greeter asked if they could direct a visitor to a section of the store. That allows the greeter to tell everyone via mic/earpiece where a customer is going and that they need to be pounced on within 30 seconds (store policy).

– Someone would take it upon himself or herself to look to see how our store is doing in relationship to our daily goal and to push us toward selling harder, regardless of how we’re performing that day.

– Hidden behind the idea of teaching people about the technologies we offer, every part of the sales process is geared toward two basic concepts; what will it take to get you to walk out with something today and how can I get you to purchase an extended warrantee with that?

At this point, I feel obligated to mention that this post is not designed to be a gripe against The City. Far from it. However, as it is a large corporate failure happening today, and because of my perspective, my aim is to use it as a case study and a blueprint of what not to do if you hope to enjoy sales success long term.

Starting with the first encounter with a customer walking into the store, the idea that every single guest needs to be contacted at least once within the first 30 seconds generates a very fundamental negative scenario; due to a lack of communication and forced zeal, customers aren’t so much helped as they are hounded. This has left a very poor taste in the mouth of many customers and generated the appearance of desperation on behalf of the store.

When an eager employee takes it upon themselves to look up and announce daily store performance, that can be helpful. When that information is always couched with “…but we can do better,” it’s demotivating. Nothing the staff can do is good enough. Therefore, why try? Especially when most of the floor team within this type of company is younger, motivation is crucial to success.

I have been on the customer side of “What will it take to get you to buy today.” It’s uncomfortable. It creates, by nature, resistance. A wise customer should always feel like a good deal today will still be a good deal tomorrow. The recipe for success for The City would have included the philosophies of you’ll buy from us because we have the best selection, the best prices, the best policies, and we’ll spend time working on find the right item for you. Because we will only deal with you with respect and honesty, you will have the utmost confidence that we have your best interests in mind and if you don’t buy today, you will tomorrow. We buy items we need from manufacturers we know and people/companies we trust. The “buy now” concept is actually effective short term. Long-term success doesn’t rely on having someone buying an item today. It’s directly dependant on someone buying today AND tomorrow. Bully or pressure someone into buying now, they don’t come back. And, of course, they generate a whole negative word-of-mouth campaign against you.

The last item I mentioned, extended warrantees, are almost never a good idea. Thankfully, most people see through the smoke and mirrors and wisely decline the add-on. I don’t think additional discussion on the topic is warranted.

If you’re a retailer or other business owner within a brick and mortar storefront, have you taken the time to reexamine your company’s sales philosophies from the customer perspective? If you were a customer, would you feel welcome? Would you come back? Would you tell others to go there? Honest answers to those questions are key to generation of more sales.

Written by Jeff York

January 26, 2009 at 1:58 am

It’s never easy being an Agent of Change

leave a comment »

You would be hard pressed to find a good manager that doesn’t believe in the importance of remaining nimble and implementing change to remain current with the ever-evolving business landscape.

But, if that’s true, then why is it so hard getting others to follow you as you act as an Agent of Change?

It’s been my experience that often people oppose change for a variety of reasons and not all of them are a conscious decision.  But all of them act as impediments toward positive change much to the organization’s detriment.

Perhaps the most sinister explanation revolves around having a vested interest in the status quo.  Human beings, by nature, like to be comfortable.  After we’ve been in a position for any period of time, we tend to get comfortable.  We know what we can get away with.  We know how to execute what is expected of us and how to deliver just enough to look good enough to not get fired.  Start creating change and you may create an environment where good enough isn’t good enough anymore.  You might start having employee’s weaknesses exposed.  A situation exists where people might have to accomplish more, accomplish differently, and maybe even take on responsibilities where they aren’t as proficient, interested, or accomplished.  You are threatening to take people into the unknown and that can be scary.

Oh man!  First you try to do what’s right for the company and then you have to do battle with your co-workers.  Is it worth it?

Let’s see.  Implement positive change and the company grows.  You prosper.  Those that battled you prosper.  Absolutely it’s worth it.  But you have to ask yourself these question first.

1.  Will I have the proper support of those above me?

2.  Will I be given enough authority to enact change?

3.  Is the change I want to do really a positive thing for the company or am I just doing this to look good and put it on my resume?  You have to be very honest here with yourself.

4.  Am I really married to the concepts I’m proposing or am I open to input from a variety of sources that might improve my original plan?

What have you done that’s created positive change within your organization?  During the development of the initative, did you encounter resistance?  If so, how did you counter that and turn adversaries into allies?